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Author Topic: SJW Watch 2017: Assorted Choo-choos  (Read 25573 times)

GFR

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SJW Watch 2017: Assorted Choo-choos
« on: January 02, 2017, 03:55:24 PM »
+2
New year, new thread.

Dump your SJW shit here.

Got a better subtitle? Post it below, but be mindful of the gay trans-species unicorns. v

I'll run a vote for best subtitle in a week or so. Entries based on upvotes.
« Last Edit: January 26, 2017, 01:10:29 AM by GFR »

Bill Wilkins

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Re: SJW Watch 2017: How is this still a thing?
« Reply #1 on: January 02, 2017, 05:59:25 PM »
+9

Welcome to 2017.

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Re: SJW Watch 2017: How is this still a thing?
« Reply #2 on: January 02, 2017, 06:29:16 PM »
+10
http://www.breitbart.com/london/2017/01/02/cologne-police-attacked-racial-profiling-new-years-eve-security-operation/

Quote
Cologne Police Attacked for ‘Racial Profiling’ During New Year’s Eve Security Operation

by OLIVER JJ LANE2 Jan 20172,795

Hailed a success by its organisers for reducing the number of violent crimes committed on New Year’s Eve from over 1,000 last year to less than a dozen, Cologne police are now being criticised for using “racial” methods.

Left-wing activists, including members of the local Green party, have criticised the police for focusing their security efforts too clearly at the same groups which were identified as the main perpetrators of the 2016 attacks. The comments came after Cologne police controlled thousands of so-called ‘Nafris’ — North Africans — as they attempted to enter the city centre ring of steel.

Germany’s Deutsche Welle reports the remarks of Green party chairman Simone Peter who noted that while the measures had worked, he doubted the legality of the police’s actions. He said: “It raises the question of proportionality and legality when around 1,000 people were checked and partially detained based on their appearance alone.”

Meanwhile left-wing politician Christopher Lauer, active at times with the Social Democrats and Pirate Protest Party, said of the terms used by Cologne police that it was “sweeping prejudice against an entire group of people based on their appearance”.

“I regard this term as highly dehumanizing.”


Despite the ill feeling over the approach, Cologne’s local Express newspaper reports the arrest of a 38-year-old Syrian on New Year’s Eve as police believed “urgent” action was necessary following intelligence he was planning a terror attack that evening. The migrant had previously been arrested for terror-financing offences.

Cologne police gave regular updates through the night and local newspapers carried updates from the force reporting the number of Nafris who had been stopped, searched, and turned away. Upon arriving, hundreds of potential migrant troublemakers and even individuals known to have been involved in the 2016 attacks were immediately turned around and escorted to trains out of the centre.

In all, 1,200 Nafris were controlled by Cologne police. In addition, the force recorded two sexual assaults, six thefts, and 29 individuals were arrested. One train coming into the city which police learnt had 300 North Africans on-board was stopped and turned back just before it reached the centre.

This contrasts with the 2016 celebrations when over 500 women were recorded as victims of sexual assault and 28 were raped. Including other crimes such as thefts and assaults, there were some 1,300 victims.


Cologne’s police chief was forced to retire early after the policing failure, which saw less than 100 officers on patrol for the whole city. Now defending the force from having policed the event too thoroughly instead, chief Jürgen Mathies said that while they had deliberately targeted Nafris for searches and identity checks, of the hundreds met in this way “there was a clear threat of criminal activity present”.

He said “We had groups of people who were comparably aggressive” to those that police encountered last year.

The police chief also emphasised the fact that police hadn’t only performed security checks on North Africans, but had investigated other groups as well. The city’s mayor called the measures “necessary”.

The force also defended the ‘Nafri’ term, which was admitted to be an internal policing term. An internal document describing Nafris revealed in the German press briefs police officers that they come from Egypt, Algeria, Lebanon, Libya, Morocco, Syria, Tunisia, are generally between 15 and 25-years-old, and are violent.

The document states: “The clientele behaves very aggressively against intervening police officers and city colleagues… Armaments (folding knives) are regularly carried.”

Put me down for "The Year of the Cockass"

Saurons Scrotal Sack

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Re: SJW Watch 2017: How is this still a thing?
« Reply #3 on: January 02, 2017, 06:42:34 PM »
+23
The sooner our police realize that you just can't please these people, the better.

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Re: SJW Watch 2017: How is this still a thing?
« Reply #4 on: January 02, 2017, 09:49:04 PM »
+30
Props to the police for actually doing their jobs.  If leftists and slimes weren't angry, then you know the police fucked up.

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Re: SJW Watch 2017: How is this still a thing?
« Reply #5 on: January 03, 2017, 07:58:36 AM »
+8
It isn't racial profiling if a massive amount (or pretty much all) crimes are committed by one group. If you were investigating the Mafia, you wouldn't fucking have equality of investigation on all races and nationalities. These people are fucking retarded and just begging to be taken advantage of and curbed stomped into submission by more aggressive ideologies.

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Re: SJW Watch 2017: How is this still a thing?
« Reply #6 on: January 03, 2017, 12:38:58 PM »
+7
No, it is racial profiling. But who said racial profiling is inherently a bad thing?

(Echoes in 3...2...)

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Re: SJW Watch 2017: How is this still a thing?
« Reply #7 on: January 03, 2017, 01:17:38 PM »
+5
Clearly what they should have done is to arrest an equal number of whites and blacks just so the statistics look nicer.

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Re: SJW Watch 2017: How is this still a thing?
« Reply #8 on: January 03, 2017, 04:47:20 PM »
+13
Typical college democrat who was 100000% a Berniebro then immediately switched to Hilary, who complains constantly about not having any money and how terrible white males and trump are(lily white from one of the safest, whitest schools left in this area).


Yes, because toddlers have killed way more people than the Pulse nightclub shooter (Muslim terrorist), the San Bernandino couple (Muslim terrorists), the Nice and Berlin truck drivers (Muslim terrorists), the Paris attackers (whole bunch of, you guessed it).  You are totally correct AND funny, you go girl! Take THAT reDUMBlicans! :reagan:

Juniper1

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Re: SJW Watch 2017: How is this still a thing?
« Reply #9 on: January 11, 2017, 09:42:05 PM »
+9
Thought you guys would appreciate this, from the "SJW activism eating itself" world: https://www.nytimes.com/2017/01/09/us/womens-march-on-washington-opens-contentious-dialogues-about-race.html
Quote
Many thousands of women are expected to converge on the nation’s capital for the Women’s March on Washington the day after Donald J. Trump’s inauguration. Jennifer Willis no longer plans to be one of them.

Ms. Willis, a 50-year-old wedding minister from South Carolina, had looked forward to taking her daughters to the march. Then she read a post on the Facebook page for the march that made her feel unwelcome because she is white.

The post, written by a black activist from Brooklyn who is a march volunteer, advised “white allies” to listen more and talk less. It also chided those who, it said, were only now waking up to racism because of the election.

“You don’t just get to join because now you’re scared, too,” read the post. “I was born scared.”

Stung by the tone, Ms. Willis canceled her trip.

“This is a women’s march,” she said. “We’re supposed to be allies in equal pay, marriage, adoption. Why is it now about, ‘White women don’t understand black women’?”

If all goes as planned, the Jan. 21 march will be a momentous display of unity in protest of a president whose treatment of women came to dominate the campaign’s final weeks. But long before the first buses roll to Washington and sister demonstrations take place in other cities, contentious conversations about race have erupted nearly every day among marchers, exhilarating some and alienating others.

In Tennessee, emotions ran high when organizers changed the name of the local march from “Women’s March on Washington-Nashville” to “Power Together Tennessee, in solidarity with Women’s March on Washington.” While many applauded the name change, which was meant to signal the start of a new social justice movement in Nashville, some complained that the event had turned from a march for all women into a march for black women.

In Louisiana, the first state coordinator gave up her volunteer role in part because there were no minority women in leadership positions at that time.

“I got a lot of flak locally when I stepped down, from white women who said that I’m alienating a lot of white women,” said Candice Huber, a bookstore owner in New Orleans, who is white. “They said, ‘Why do you have to be so divisive?’”

In some ways, the discord is by design. Even as they are working to ensure a smooth and unified march next week, the national organizers said they made a deliberate decision to highlight the plight of minority and undocumented immigrant women and provoke uncomfortable discussions about race.

“This was an opportunity to take the conversation to the deep places,” said Linda Sarsour, a Muslim who heads the Arab American Association of New York and is one of four co-chairwomen of the national march. “Sometimes you are going to upset people.”

The post that offended Ms. Willis was part of that effort. So was the quotation posted on the march’s Facebook page from Bell Hooks, the black feminist, about forging a stronger sisterhood by “confronting the ways women — through sex, class and race — dominated and exploited other women.”

In response, a New Jersey woman wrote: “I’m starting to feel not very welcome in this endeavor.”

A debate then ensued about whether white women were just now experiencing what minority women experience daily, or were having a hard time yielding control. A young white woman from Baltimore wrote with bitterness that white women who might have been victims of rape and abuse were being “asked to check their privilege,” a catchphrase that refers to people acknowledging their advantages, but which even some liberal women find unduly confrontational.

No one involved with the march fears that the rancor will dampen turnout; even many of those who expressed dismay at the tone of the discussion said they still intended to join what is sure to be the largest demonstration yet against the Trump presidency.

“I will march,” one wrote on the march’s Facebook page, “Hoping that someday soon a sense of unity will occur before it’s too late.”

But these debates over race also reflect deeper questions about the future of progressivism in the age of Trump. Should the march highlight what divides women, or what unites them? Is there room for women who have never heard of “white privilege”?

And at a time when a presidential candidate ran against political correctness and won — with half of white female voters supporting him — is this the time to tone down talk about race or to double down?

“If your short-term goal is to get as many people as possible at the march, maybe you don’t want to alienate people,” said Anne Valk, the author of “Radical Sisters,” a book about racial and class differences in the women’s movement. “But if your longer-term goal is to use the march as a catalyst for progressive social and political change, then that has to include thinking about race and class privilege.”

The discord also reflects the variety of women’s rights and liberal causes being represented at the march, as well as a generational divide.

Many older white women spent their lives fighting for rights like workplace protections that younger women now take for granted. Many young activists have spent years protesting police tactics and criminal justice policies — issues they feel too many white liberals have ignored.

“Yes, equal pay is an issue,” Ms. Sarsour said. “But look at the ratio of what white women get paid versus black women and Latina women.”

For too long, the march organizers said, the women’s rights movement focused on issues that were important to well-off white women, such as the ability to work outside the home and attain the same high-powered positions that men do. But minority women, they said, have had different priorities. Black women who have worked their whole lives as maids might care more about the minimum wage or police brutality than about seeing a woman in the White House. Undocumented immigrant women might care about abortion rights, they said, but not nearly as much as they worry about being deported.

This brand of feminism — frequently referred to as “intersectionality” — asks white women to acknowledge that they have had it easier. It speaks candidly about the history of racism, even within the feminist movement itself. The organizers of the 1913 suffrage march on Washington asked black women to march at the back of the parade.

The issue of race has followed the march from its inception. The day after the election, Bob Bland, a fashion designer in New York, floated the idea of a march in Washington on Facebook. Within hours, 3,000 people said they would join. Then a friend called to tell Ms. Bland that a woman in Hawaii with a similar page had collected pledges from 12,000 people.

“I thought, ‘Wow, let’s merge,’” Ms. Bland recalled.

As the effort grew, a number of comments on Facebook implored Ms. Bland, who is white, to include minority women on the leadership team. Ms. Bland felt strongly that it was the right thing to do. Within three days of the election, Carmen Perez, a Hispanic activist working on juvenile justice, and Tamika D. Mallory, a gun control activist who is black, joined Ms. Bland.

Gloria Steinem, honorary co-chairwoman of the march along with Harry Belafonte, lauded their approach. “Sexism is always made worse by racism — and vice versa,” she said in an email.

Ms. Steinem, who plans to participate in a town hall meeting during the march with Alicia Garza, a co-founder of Black Lives Matter, said even contentious conversations about race were a “good thing.”

“It’s about knowing each other,” she wrote. “Which is what movements and marches are for.”

But the tone of the discussion, particularly online, can become so raw that some would-be marchers feel they are no longer welcome.

Ms. Willis, the South Carolina wedding minister, had been looking forward to the salve of rallying with people who share her values, a rarity in her home state, where she said she had been insulted and shouted at for marrying gay couples.

But then she read a post by ShiShi Rose, a 27-year-old blogger from Brooklyn.

“Now is the time for you to be listening more, talking less,” Ms. Rose wrote. “You should be reading our books and understanding the roots of racism and white supremacy. Listening to our speeches. You should be drowning yourselves in our poetry.”

It rubbed Ms. Willis the wrong way.

“How do you know that I’m not reading black poetry?” she asked in an interview. Ms. Willis says that she understands being born white gives her advantages, and that she is always open to learning more about the struggles of others.

But, she said, “The last thing that is going to make me endeared to you, to know you and love you more, is if you are sitting there wagging your finger at me.”

Ms. Rose said in an interview that the intention of the post was not to weed people out but rather to make them understand that they had a lot of learning to do.

“I needed them to understand that they don’t just get to join the march and not check their privilege constantly,” she said.

That phrase — check your privilege — exasperates Ms. Willis. She asked a reporter: “Can you please tell me what that means?”

An anti-Trump march getting bogged down in identity politics is...appropriate.

Talcum X

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Re: SJW Watch 2017: How is this still a thing?
« Reply #10 on: January 11, 2017, 10:48:09 PM »
+4
Ho-ly shit,

https://www.washingtonpost.com/local/social-issues/men-slow-to-show-support-for-the-womens-march/2017/01/09/17877ba4-d35d-11e6-a783-cd3fa950f2fd_story.html?utm_term=.39ed1a577174



I should've guessed, its been 5 minutes since I've seen a spineless lib cuck shoving a black baby in front of their gay faces in order to make themselves feel better about what someone else's ancestors did

And from one of the women's marches FB's:



Quote
This tiny feminist is why Mia Matias (@miamatias) marches.

"Because I want her to know that her body is her choice and I'll be damned if the government thinks it has any say with what she can or can't do with it. Because in our home we judge people by their character and not their religion or skin color. Because I wake up everyday and choose to be a stay at home mom and that doesn't make me any less of a feminist. Because whether she too is a stay at home mom, a career woman, married, single, gay or straight, that it does not make her any less of a woman. Because as a white woman who has had a very privileged life, I have so much to learn and have to check my privilege constantly- as do we all. That's #whyimarch"

Good job covering your ass there at the end so the nogs in your little club don't turn and feed on you, honkey :reagan:

Juniper1

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Re: SJW Watch 2017: How is this still a thing?
« Reply #11 on: January 12, 2017, 12:51:47 AM »
+10
"Constantly" checking your privilege shows up in that quote and in my article. That sounds really exhausting.

Like, if you're taking a shit, still gotta check? If you're eating french fries, do you have to check the privilege at every fry? Is there a way to check privilege while sleeping?

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Re: SJW Watch 2017: How is this still a thing?
« Reply #12 on: January 12, 2017, 02:50:08 AM »
+15
"Constantly" checking your privilege shows up in that quote and in my article. That sounds really exhausting.

Like, if you're taking a shit, still gotta check? If you're eating french fries, do you have to check the privilege at every fry? Is there a way to check privilege while sleeping?
Well, you could invite into your house the brownest refugee you can find so he can provide you with some nighttime raping. Or as the leftists call it, "undocumented marriage".

J Dog

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Re: SJW Watch 2017: How is this still a thing?
« Reply #13 on: January 12, 2017, 06:47:01 AM »
+14
I'm particularly fond of this passage

Quote
“How do you know that I’m not reading black poetry?”


The only black struggle is the struggle to get white people interested in their open mic night.

Ghostse

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Re: SJW Watch 2017: How is this still a thing?
« Reply #14 on: January 12, 2017, 10:09:48 PM »
+9
I'm particularly fond of this passage

Quote
“How do you know that I’m not reading black poetry?”


The only black struggle is the struggle to get white people interested in their open mic night.

Also their mixtapes.
Let me know when the next SASS spinoff starts.

Hollywood Shabat Goy Yaro

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Re: SJW Watch 2017: How is this still a thing?
« Reply #15 on: January 12, 2017, 10:11:54 PM »
+3
Ho-ly shit,

https://www.washingtonpost.com/local/social-issues/men-slow-to-show-support-for-the-womens-march/2017/01/09/17877ba4-d35d-11e6-a783-cd3fa950f2fd_story.html?utm_term=.39ed1a577174



I should've guessed, its been 5 minutes since I've seen a spineless lib cuck shoving a black baby in front of their gay faces in order to make themselves feel better about what someone else's ancestors did

And from one of the women's marches FB's:



Quote
This tiny feminist is why Mia Matias (@miamatias) marches.

"Because I want her to know that her body is her choice and I'll be damned if the government thinks it has any say with what she can or can't do with it. Because in our home we judge people by their character and not their religion or skin color. Because I wake up everyday and choose to be a stay at home mom and that doesn't make me any less of a feminist. Because whether she too is a stay at home mom, a career woman, married, single, gay or straight, that it does not make her any less of a woman. Because as a white woman who has had a very privileged life, I have so much to learn and have to check my privilege constantly- as do we all. That's #whyimarch"

Good job covering your ass there at the end so the nogs in your little club don't turn and feed on you, honkey :reagan:

I wonder how much that prog ghoul paid for his walnut. :stonk: :stonk: :stonk: :stonk:


Quote

I just wanted to live a normal life.  Have a wife and kids, be a father.  But then my other side tells me that I want to get breast and butt implants and get a job working as a plus size model for Victoria's Secret.

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Re: SJW Watch 2017: Republican Toddlers with Guns did Election 2016
« Reply #16 on: January 14, 2017, 05:25:37 AM »
+24

But I do often point out that I write both science fiction and fantasy. It’s just that the science fiction is usually titled ‘technical proposal’ and the fantasy is titled ‘budget proposal.’

- Jordin Kare

Talcum X

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Re: SJW Watch 2017: Republican Toddlers with Guns did Election 2016
« Reply #17 on: January 14, 2017, 12:33:33 PM »
+19
More realistically its:

 :unparsons: (thinking to himself) *Maybe THIS will finally make up for what my terrible, horrible, racist ancestors did*
"Give me 3 or 4 more good ones please!"

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Re: SJW Watch 2017: Republican Toddlers with Guns did Election 2016
« Reply #18 on: January 23, 2017, 04:03:24 AM »
+18
Listens to nigger beats

Receives nigger beats :smug:

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Re: SJW Watch 2017: Something something something BIGOTS
« Reply #19 on: January 24, 2017, 06:26:08 PM »
+2






(still would)
But I do often point out that I write both science fiction and fantasy. It’s just that the science fiction is usually titled ‘technical proposal’ and the fantasy is titled ‘budget proposal.’

- Jordin Kare

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Re: SJW Watch 2017: Something something something BIGOTS
« Reply #20 on: January 24, 2017, 08:40:02 PM »
+3
Old hag on the right in the middle photo has a prolapsed vag probably just like her own.

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Re: SJW Watch 2017: Something something something BIGOTS
« Reply #21 on: January 24, 2017, 09:03:19 PM »
+24
In 500 years historians will study this and wonder why we let so many obviously dangerously insane people just walk around unfettered in public.

Hollywood Shabat Goy Yaro

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Re: SJW Watch 2017: Something something something BIGOTS
« Reply #22 on: January 24, 2017, 09:54:21 PM »
+32
These people probably spent more time, money, and energy making fake vaginas than they probably did to support their own Dem candidates in the election.


Quote

I just wanted to live a normal life.  Have a wife and kids, be a father.  But then my other side tells me that I want to get breast and butt implants and get a job working as a plus size model for Victoria's Secret.

Junkers Ju 888

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Re: SJW Watch 2017: Something something something BIGOTS
« Reply #23 on: January 24, 2017, 11:47:53 PM »
+27
These people probably spent more time, money, and energy making fake vaginas than they probably did to support their own Dem candidates in the election.
Is this the troon thread?

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Re: SJW Watch 2017: Something something something BIGOTS
« Reply #24 on: January 25, 2017, 01:46:37 PM »
+3
(assorted choo-choos)

Mmm... you can just taste the moderates edging more and more surely towards the right.