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Author Topic: Random Posts from the Feminism and Gender Equality Thread  (Read 963158 times)

nothere

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Re: Random Posts from the Feminism and Gender Equality Thread
« Reply #2650 on: August 23, 2013, 12:17:56 AM »
0
I registered just to post this gem.

Quote from: solovyov" post="418709853
That's a good piece, thanks for sharing it. I'm reminded of a conversation I had with my mom (nice liberal white lady feminist) when she started doing a type of volunteer work that required her to visit clients in a very poor, very black part of town (in the middle of the day!) and she was worried about people messing with her. It took a lot of talking to convince her that if anything people would be made too nervous by her presence to fuck with her. That a white woman in her 60s with signifiers of upper class status would not move around that community with a "victim" sign over her head as much as a "do not touch or you will get fucked" sign.


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Re: Random Posts from the Feminism and Gender Equality Thread
« Reply #2651 on: August 23, 2013, 12:37:10 AM »
0
I registered just to post this gem.

Quote from: solovyov" post="418709853
That's a good piece, thanks for sharing it. I'm reminded of a conversation I had with my mom (nice liberal white lady feminist) when she started doing a type of volunteer work that required her to visit clients in a very poor, very black part of town (in the middle of the day!) and she was worried about people messing with her. It took a lot of talking to convince her that if anything people would be made too nervous by her presence to fuck with her. That a white woman in her 60s with signifiers of upper class status would not move around that community with a "victim" sign over her head as much as a "do not touch or you will get fucked" sign.
welcome friend, but to that poster I say

:lolno:

Also, so I never lose this again (amazingly hard to search for a specific rapi in Haiti!):

http://www.race-talk.org/we-are-not-your-weapons-we-are-women/

Quote
We are not your weapons – we are women
April 19, 2010 | Filed under: Haiti | Posted by: Guest Author
By Amanda Kijera, civic journalist and activist in Haiti

Two weeks ago, on a Monday morning, I started to write what I thought was a very clever editorial about violence against women in Haiti. The case, I believed, was being overstated by women’s organizations in need of additional resources. Ever committed to preserving the dignity of Black men in a world which constantly stereotypes them as violent savages, I viewed this writing as yet one more opportunity to fight “the man” on behalf of my brothers. That night, before I could finish the piece, I was held on a rooftop in Haiti and raped repeatedly by one of the very men who I had spent the bulk of my life advocating for.

It hurt. The experience was almost more than I could bear. I begged him to stop. Afraid he would kill me, I pleaded with him to honor my commitment to Haiti, to him as a brother in the mutual struggle for an end to our common oppression, but to no avail. He didn’t care that I was a Malcolm X scholar. He told me to shut up, and then slapped me in the face. Overpowered, I gave up fighting halfway through the night.

Accepting the helplessness of my situation, I chucked aside the Haiti bracelet I had worn so proudly for over a year, along with it, my dreams of human liberation. Someone, I told myself, would always be bigger and stronger than me. As a woman, my place in life had been ascribed from birth. A Chinese proverb says that “women are like the grass, meant to be stepped on.” The thought comforted me at the same time that it made me cringe.

A dangerous thought. Others like it have derailed movements, discouraged consciousness and retarded progress for centuries. To accept it as truth signals the beginning of the end of a person–or community’s–life and ability to self-love. Resignation means inertia, and for the past two weeks I have inhabited its innards. My neighbors here include women from all over the world, but it’s the women of African descent, and particularly Haitian women, who move me to write now.

Truly, I have witnessed as a journalist and human rights advocate the many injustices inflicted upon Black men in this world. The pain, trauma and rage born of exploitation are terrors that I have grappled with every day of my life. They make one want to strike back, to fight rabidly for what is left of their personal dignity in the wake of such things. Black men have every right to the anger they feel in response to their position in the global hierarchy, but their anger is misdirected.

Women are not the source of their oppression; oppressive policies and the as-yet unaddressed white patriarchy which still dominates the global stage are. Because women–and particularly women of color–are forced to bear the brunt of the Black male response to the Black male plight, the international community and those nations who have benefitted from the oppression of colonized peoples have a responsibility to provide women with the protection that they need.

The United Nations, western women’s organizations and the Haitian government must immediately provide women in Haiti with the funding that they need to build domestic violence and rape crisis centers. Stop dividing Black families by distributing solely to women, which only exaggerates male resentment and frustration in Haiti. Provide both women and men with job training programs that would allow for self-sufficiency as opposed to continued dependency on whites. Lastly, admit that the issue of racial integration might still need addressing on an international level, and then find a way to address it!

I went to Haiti after the earthquake to empower Haitians to self-sufficiency. I went to remind them of the many great contributions that Afro-descendants have made to this world, and of their amazing resilience and strength as a people. Not once did I envision myself becoming a receptacle for a Black man’s rage at the white world, but that is what I became. While I take issue with my brother’s behavior, I’m grateful for the experience. It woke me up, made me understand on a deeper level the terror that my sisters deal with daily. This in hand, I feel comfortable in speaking for Haitian women, and for myself, in saying that we will not be your pawns, racially, politically, economically or otherwise.

We are women, not weapons of war. Thankfully, there are organizations here in Haiti who continues to fight for women’s human rights like, MADRE, SOFA and Enfofanm.





Rather than allowing myself to be used in such a fashion, and as opposed to submitting to the frustration and bitterness that can be born of such an experience, I choose to continue to love and educate instead. My brothers can be sensitized to women’s realities in Haiti and the world over if these are presented to them by using their own clashes with racism and oppression as a starting point.

They must be made to understand the dangerous likelihood of the oppressed becoming the oppressor if no shift in consciousnesses takes place and if no end to the cycle of trauma occurs. I intend to see that it does…by continuing to live and work fearlessly with justice in mind, through the creation of a safe space for women in Haiti and by creating programming for Haitian men that considers their needs, too. Weapons annihilate, dialogue bears fruit.

It’s the fruit I’m interested in now, no matter how strange or bruised it might appear.

« Last Edit: August 23, 2013, 12:47:56 AM by SOUL TRAN »
"If ye love wealth better than liberty, the tranquility of servitude better than the animating contest of freedom, go home from us in peace. We ask not your counsels or arms. Crouch down and lick the hands which feed you. May your chains set lightly upon you, and may posterity forget that ye were our countrymen."


unprivsplain

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Re: Random Posts from the Feminism and Gender Equality Thread
« Reply #2652 on: August 23, 2013, 12:42:08 AM »
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That's almost as dumb as that gynecologists not being able to tell the difference between a woman and a tranny.

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Re: Random Posts from the Feminism and Gender Equality Thread
« Reply #2653 on: August 23, 2013, 12:42:44 AM »
0
I registered just to post this gem.

Quote from: solovyov" post="418709853
That's a good piece, thanks for sharing it. I'm reminded of a conversation I had with my mom (nice liberal white lady feminist) when she started doing a type of volunteer work that required her to visit clients in a very poor, very black part of town (in the middle of the day!) and she was worried about people messing with her. It took a lot of talking to convince her that if anything people would be made too nervous by her presence to fuck with her. That a white woman in her 60s with signifiers of upper class status would not move around that community with a "victim" sign over her head as much as a "do not touch or you will get fucked" sign.

I'm struggling to comprehend it's meaning.  What does this puzzle MEAN

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Re: Random Posts from the Feminism and Gender Equality Thread
« Reply #2654 on: August 23, 2013, 12:48:48 AM »
0
I registered just to post this gem.

Quote from: solovyov" post="418709853
That's a good piece, thanks for sharing it. I'm reminded of a conversation I had with my mom (nice liberal white lady feminist) when she started doing a type of volunteer work that required her to visit clients in a very poor, very black part of town (in the middle of the day!) and she was worried about people messing with her. It took a lot of talking to convince her that if anything people would be made too nervous by her presence to fuck with her. That a white woman in her 60s with signifiers of upper class status would not move around that community with a "victim" sign over her head as much as a "do not touch or you will get fucked" sign.

"It's cool mom, your privilege is bulletproof. I've never actually met a person of color, but I'm sure they know their place."

unprivsplain

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Re: Random Posts from the Feminism and Gender Equality Thread
« Reply #2655 on: August 23, 2013, 12:49:47 AM »
0
People say that about animals, so maybe it was some super subtle racism.

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Re: Random Posts from the Feminism and Gender Equality Thread
« Reply #2656 on: August 23, 2013, 01:09:11 AM »
0
I registered just to post this gem.

Quote from: solovyov" post="418709853
That's a good piece, thanks for sharing it. I'm reminded of a conversation I had with my mom (nice liberal white lady feminist) when she started doing a type of volunteer work that required her to visit clients in a very poor, very black part of town (in the middle of the day!) and she was worried about people messing with her. It took a lot of talking to convince her that if anything people would be made too nervous by her presence to fuck with her. That a white woman in her 60s with signifiers of upper class status would not move around that community with a "victim" sign over her head as much as a "do not touch or you will get fucked" sign.
welcome friend, but to that poster I say

:lolno:

Also, so I never lose this again (amazingly hard to search for a specific rapi in Haiti!):

http://www.race-talk.org/we-are-not-your-weapons-we-are-women/

Quote
We are not your weapons – we are women
April 19, 2010 | Filed under: Haiti | Posted by: Guest Author
By Amanda Kijera, civic journalist and activist in Haiti

Two weeks ago, on a Monday morning, I started to write what I thought was a very clever editorial about violence against women in Haiti. The case, I believed, was being overstated by women’s organizations in need of additional resources. Ever committed to preserving the dignity of Black men in a world which constantly stereotypes them as violent savages, I viewed this writing as yet one more opportunity to fight “the man” on behalf of my brothers. That night, before I could finish the piece, I was held on a rooftop in Haiti and raped repeatedly by one of the very men who I had spent the bulk of my life advocating for.

It hurt. The experience was almost more than I could bear. I begged him to stop. Afraid he would kill me, I pleaded with him to honor my commitment to Haiti, to him as a brother in the mutual struggle for an end to our common oppression, but to no avail. He didn’t care that I was a Malcolm X scholar. He told me to shut up, and then slapped me in the face. Overpowered, I gave up fighting halfway through the night.

Accepting the helplessness of my situation, I chucked aside the Haiti bracelet I had worn so proudly for over a year, along with it, my dreams of human liberation. Someone, I told myself, would always be bigger and stronger than me. As a woman, my place in life had been ascribed from birth. A Chinese proverb says that “women are like the grass, meant to be stepped on.” The thought comforted me at the same time that it made me cringe.

A dangerous thought. Others like it have derailed movements, discouraged consciousness and retarded progress for centuries. To accept it as truth signals the beginning of the end of a person–or community’s–life and ability to self-love. Resignation means inertia, and for the past two weeks I have inhabited its innards. My neighbors here include women from all over the world, but it’s the women of African descent, and particularly Haitian women, who move me to write now.

Truly, I have witnessed as a journalist and human rights advocate the many injustices inflicted upon Black men in this world. The pain, trauma and rage born of exploitation are terrors that I have grappled with every day of my life. They make one want to strike back, to fight rabidly for what is left of their personal dignity in the wake of such things. Black men have every right to the anger they feel in response to their position in the global hierarchy, but their anger is misdirected.

Women are not the source of their oppression; oppressive policies and the as-yet unaddressed white patriarchy which still dominates the global stage are. Because women–and particularly women of color–are forced to bear the brunt of the Black male response to the Black male plight, the international community and those nations who have benefitted from the oppression of colonized peoples have a responsibility to provide women with the protection that they need.

The United Nations, western women’s organizations and the Haitian government must immediately provide women in Haiti with the funding that they need to build domestic violence and rape crisis centers. Stop dividing Black families by distributing solely to women, which only exaggerates male resentment and frustration in Haiti. Provide both women and men with job training programs that would allow for self-sufficiency as opposed to continued dependency on whites. Lastly, admit that the issue of racial integration might still need addressing on an international level, and then find a way to address it!

I went to Haiti after the earthquake to empower Haitians to self-sufficiency. I went to remind them of the many great contributions that Afro-descendants have made to this world, and of their amazing resilience and strength as a people. Not once did I envision myself becoming a receptacle for a Black man’s rage at the white world, but that is what I became. While I take issue with my brother’s behavior, I’m grateful for the experience. It woke me up, made me understand on a deeper level the terror that my sisters deal with daily. This in hand, I feel comfortable in speaking for Haitian women, and for myself, in saying that we will not be your pawns, racially, politically, economically or otherwise.

We are women, not weapons of war. Thankfully, there are organizations here in Haiti who continues to fight for women’s human rights like, MADRE, SOFA and Enfofanm.





Rather than allowing myself to be used in such a fashion, and as opposed to submitting to the frustration and bitterness that can be born of such an experience, I choose to continue to love and educate instead. My brothers can be sensitized to women’s realities in Haiti and the world over if these are presented to them by using their own clashes with racism and oppression as a starting point.

They must be made to understand the dangerous likelihood of the oppressed becoming the oppressor if no shift in consciousnesses takes place and if no end to the cycle of trauma occurs. I intend to see that it does…by continuing to live and work fearlessly with justice in mind, through the creation of a safe space for women in Haiti and by creating programming for Haitian men that considers their needs, too. Weapons annihilate, dialogue bears fruit.

It’s the fruit I’m interested in now, no matter how strange or bruised it might appear.
A while ago I thought, 'maybe this article isn't real... maybe it's some kind of right-wing prank to make liberals look stupid. Maybe I was just gullible for believing it... no-one can be THAT stupid".

Then I did my research and found out that "Race-talk" is a dead serious website and couldn't possibly be fake. Kill everyone.

SSOUL TRANN

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Re: Random Posts from the Feminism and Gender Equality Thread
« Reply #2657 on: August 23, 2013, 01:15:55 AM »
0
Oh yeah, it's real, and this is that coalburner's facebook (she shut down her blog and started "blogging" on facebook.)

https://www.facebook.com/amanda.kijera

Trigger warnings: dumb as shit, annoying cunt, white guilt


edit: oh god she think's she's black:

Quote from: a receptacle for a Black man’s rage
Sanctify the “N-word,” Feed the demon
October 14, 2012 at 11:00am
There are certain words you just don’t use. Nigger is one of them.
 
It’s an ugly word. Full of hate, uttered from a place of privilege and superiority no matter the race of those who speak it. It’s loaded with centuries of baggage. Nigger carries with it the potential to destroy interpersonal relationships and whole civil societies, which is why the media is so reluctant to use it in their reporting. The problem with this omission is that it blocks us as a nation from ever having the race-based heart-to-heart that we so desperately need to have.
 
Not all white people use the word. Growing up, though, nigger was used almost daily in our household. I hated it; my parent’s faces would constrict rat-like every time they spat it out. It scared me. Even before I knew what it meant or understood the history and pain behind the ‘n-word’, I knew that it was an evil thing. It became a powerful enough presence in my life that it led me to invest my entire being into fighting for black human rights and dignity. Needless to say, I went on to major in African Studies in college.
 
What I found in my classes was something that both surprised and disappointed me. Whites, it seemed, were not permitted to have an opinion on issues like whether or not the use of nigger was appropriate in conversation. The problems with this were two-fold; being blocked from its usage invalidated my own experiences with the word and kept me and my classmates from having a healing conversation about the racial scars that ALL of us bore.
 
I have wrestled with the nigger demon in a number of ways. As a young girl, it fell from my parents mouths’ and nestled itself deep within my psyche. Sometimes, even into adulthood, my stepdad’s voice would emerge from nowhere, shouting the hated word over and over again.
 
I was committed to silencing it. It would take lots of serious work, I knew. Lots of talking, lots of self and societal examination and a real determination to be a better person than my parents had been. Eventually, after learning to purge these pop-ups, I emerged from the process with a renewed heart and a cleaner mind.
 
Nigger returned in college, in a different but no-less stifling way. It sought to silence me. Once, I shared the story of being disowned by my family in class. At 16, my uncle had thrown me out of the house during Thanksgiving dinner after seeing pictures of my then-boyfriend. “Nigger-lover! Whore!,” he’d shouted. Twenty-one years later, I still have not been reconciled with my racist family, but what mattered most to my black classmates was the fact that I had actually said the word nigger-lover. They were outraged. The fact that racism had caused us shared pain was brushed off as a non-issue, and at least one opportunity for healing and honest dialogue was lost forever.
 
I wonder sometimes how Americans can think that our country has ever been properly integrated. To integrate a person, a technology or a nation, you’ve got to understand first the parts from which the whole is comprised. You have to have a clear understanding of how the parts work together, and to analyze the reasons why they don’t. If America can’t move beyond the distraction of the word nigger into a more meaningful discussion about our racial history, in order to provide closure and healing to her millions who have been wounded by racism, then she can never hope to be a truly integrated nation or the global leader that she seeks to be.
 
I still flinch when I hear the word nigger. But every time I hear it, and each time I am bold enough to say it in the retelling of my own story, my pain load lightens and I emerge just a little bit stronger than I was before. I learned this coping mechanism from the black people in my life, and it’s one that’s served me well. Now, if only we can convince the politically correct to allow the race conversation to take place in all of its full, spelled-out, ugly glory, we just might find ourselves as a nation truly able to exorcise the demon of racism from our shores, for once and for all.
« Last Edit: August 23, 2013, 01:40:30 AM by SOUL TRAN »
"If ye love wealth better than liberty, the tranquility of servitude better than the animating contest of freedom, go home from us in peace. We ask not your counsels or arms. Crouch down and lick the hands which feed you. May your chains set lightly upon you, and may posterity forget that ye were our countrymen."


Launchpad McQuack

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Re: Random Posts from the Feminism and Gender Equality Thread
« Reply #2658 on: August 23, 2013, 03:12:17 AM »
0
Holy shit I thought that was someone just trolling people.

Launchpad McQuack

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Re: Random Posts from the Feminism and Gender Equality Thread
« Reply #2659 on: August 23, 2013, 04:15:05 AM »
+2
I registered just to post this gem.

Quote from: solovyov" post="418709853
That's a good piece, thanks for sharing it. I'm reminded of a conversation I had with my mom (nice liberal white lady feminist) when she started doing a type of volunteer work that required her to visit clients in a very poor, very black part of town (in the middle of the day!) and she was worried about people messing with her. It took a lot of talking to convince her that if anything people would be made too nervous by her presence to fuck with her. That a white woman in her 60s with signifiers of upper class status would not move around that community with a "victim" sign over her head as much as a "do not touch or you will get fucked" sign.

Welcome, stay and post some more.

That post is fucking hilarious on so many levels. First, it's an upper class white woman from the suburbs telling another upper class white woman from the suburbs what will happen in a black neighborhood neither have ever stepped foot in. And the other hilarious thing is that they don't even believe these fucking delusions. If they truly believed these neighborhoods are safe and they'd walk around with impunity, they'd fucking move there. Housing is dirt cheap, they could buy up a whole block for what they pay for a house in the suburbs. But for all the talk SJW have about how great and safe these communities really are, none of them have the fucking guts to move in to one.

I spent my early years in a crappy area before my parents got the fuck out. Lived pretty close to real shitty areas. There is no way the seas would part for this woman. They'd probably steal her purse and phone within minutes, maybe even fuck with her car. The idea that a bunch of gangbangers who have no issue shooting indiscriminately in areas where children play are going to suddenly become nervous tip their hat to Miss Daisy is just great.

Here is what happens when some uber-liberal decides that he's taking his upper middle class white self into a poor, black neighborhood.

http://www.twincities.com/crime/ci_23829526/st-paul-man-19-charged-east-side-beating

And I'm pretty liberal myself, just not fucking delusional.

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Re: Random Posts from the Feminism and Gender Equality Thread
« Reply #2660 on: August 23, 2013, 04:46:52 AM »
0


http://www.twincities.com/crime/ci_23829526/st-paul-man-19-charged-east-side-beating


ah, the proverbial "unexpected encounter with diversity".

first, walking through a gangfight?  wtf did he think was gonna happen?
second ..." b-b-b-but defended you on the internet"


Goddamnit E/N.

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Re: Random Posts from the Feminism and Gender Equality Thread
« Reply #2661 on: August 23, 2013, 07:36:36 AM »
0

welcome friend, but to that poster I say

:lolno:

Also, so I never lose this again (amazingly hard to search for a specific rapi in Haiti!):

http://www.race-talk.org/we-are-not-your-weapons-we-are-women/

Quote
We are not your weapons – we are women
April 19, 2010 | Filed under: Haiti | Posted by: Guest Author
By Amanda Kijera, civic journalist and activist in Haiti

Two weeks ago, on a Monday morning, I started to write what I thought was a very clever editorial about violence against women in Haiti. The case, I believed, was being overstated by women’s organizations in need of additional resources. Ever committed to preserving the dignity of Black men in a world which constantly stereotypes them as violent savages, I viewed this writing as yet one more opportunity to fight “the man” on behalf of my brothers. That night, before I could finish the piece, I was held on a rooftop in Haiti and raped repeatedly by one of the very men who I had spent the bulk of my life advocating for.

It hurt. The experience was almost more than I could bear. I begged him to stop. Afraid he would kill me, I pleaded with him to honor my commitment to Haiti, to him as a brother in the mutual struggle for an end to our common oppression, but to no avail. He didn’t care that I was a Malcolm X scholar. He told me to shut up, and then slapped me in the face. Overpowered, I gave up fighting halfway through the night.

Accepting the helplessness of my situation, I chucked aside the Haiti bracelet I had worn so proudly for over a year, along with it, my dreams of human liberation. Someone, I told myself, would always be bigger and stronger than me. As a woman, my place in life had been ascribed from birth. A Chinese proverb says that “women are like the grass, meant to be stepped on.” The thought comforted me at the same time that it made me cringe.

A dangerous thought. Others like it have derailed movements, discouraged consciousness and retarded progress for centuries. To accept it as truth signals the beginning of the end of a person–or community’s–life and ability to self-love. Resignation means inertia, and for the past two weeks I have inhabited its innards. My neighbors here include women from all over the world, but it’s the women of African descent, and particularly Haitian women, who move me to write now.

Truly, I have witnessed as a journalist and human rights advocate the many injustices inflicted upon Black men in this world. The pain, trauma and rage born of exploitation are terrors that I have grappled with every day of my life. They make one want to strike back, to fight rabidly for what is left of their personal dignity in the wake of such things. Black men have every right to the anger they feel in response to their position in the global hierarchy, but their anger is misdirected.

Women are not the source of their oppression; oppressive policies and the as-yet unaddressed white patriarchy which still dominates the global stage are. Because women–and particularly women of color–are forced to bear the brunt of the Black male response to the Black male plight, the international community and those nations who have benefitted from the oppression of colonized peoples have a responsibility to provide women with the protection that they need.

The United Nations, western women’s organizations and the Haitian government must immediately provide women in Haiti with the funding that they need to build domestic violence and rape crisis centers. Stop dividing Black families by distributing solely to women, which only exaggerates male resentment and frustration in Haiti. Provide both women and men with job training programs that would allow for self-sufficiency as opposed to continued dependency on whites. Lastly, admit that the issue of racial integration might still need addressing on an international level, and then find a way to address it!

I went to Haiti after the earthquake to empower Haitians to self-sufficiency. I went to remind them of the many great contributions that Afro-descendants have made to this world, and of their amazing resilience and strength as a people. Not once did I envision myself becoming a receptacle for a Black man’s rage at the white world, but that is what I became. While I take issue with my brother’s behavior, I’m grateful for the experience. It woke me up, made me understand on a deeper level the terror that my sisters deal with daily. This in hand, I feel comfortable in speaking for Haitian women, and for myself, in saying that we will not be your pawns, racially, politically, economically or otherwise.

We are women, not weapons of war. Thankfully, there are organizations here in Haiti who continues to fight for women’s human rights like, MADRE, SOFA and Enfofanm.





Rather than allowing myself to be used in such a fashion, and as opposed to submitting to the frustration and bitterness that can be born of such an experience, I choose to continue to love and educate instead. My brothers can be sensitized to women’s realities in Haiti and the world over if these are presented to them by using their own clashes with racism and oppression as a starting point.

They must be made to understand the dangerous likelihood of the oppressed becoming the oppressor if no shift in consciousnesses takes place and if no end to the cycle of trauma occurs. I intend to see that it does…by continuing to live and work fearlessly with justice in mind, through the creation of a safe space for women in Haiti and by creating programming for Haitian men that considers their needs, too. Weapons annihilate, dialogue bears fruit.

It’s the fruit I’m interested in now, no matter how strange or bruised it might appear.
Quote

 :swanson:
« Last Edit: August 23, 2013, 07:37:37 AM by PUSSY CANCER »
sheeeeeeeeeeeeeiiiiiiiiiiiitttttttttttttttttttt

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Re: Random Posts from the Feminism and Gender Equality Thread
« Reply #2662 on: August 23, 2013, 09:21:32 AM »
+1
Quote
I have wrestled with the nigger demon in a number of ways.
:allears: :allears: :allears: :allears: :allears:

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Re: Random Posts from the Feminism and Gender Equality Thread
« Reply #2663 on: August 23, 2013, 09:34:08 AM »
+1
Quote
According to the complaint, Widstrand was attacked when he tried to walk through a group of 30 to 50 juveniles and young adults fighting near Payne and Minnehaha avenues in the Payne-Phalen neighborhood about 11:30 p.m. Sunday.

His family said he had been living in a nearby apartment for about two months.

"An innocent man was walking down the street and brutally attacked by a group of youth," said Sgt. Paul Paulos, a police spokesman. "He was out for a walk and decided to go through this group and was assaulted and knocked unconscious."

ho hum just another race riot, these misunderstood youth are upset at the system not me I'll just continue on through here unmolested

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Re: Random Posts from the Feminism and Gender Equality Thread
« Reply #2664 on: August 23, 2013, 09:38:38 AM »
0
Also holy shit, the 'thank god the black man raped me :)' woman is upset that black people overreacted because she said nigger.

Someone buy her a SS account and then the healing can truly begin. :smug:

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Re: Random Posts from the Feminism and Gender Equality Thread
« Reply #2665 on: August 23, 2013, 09:41:58 AM »
0
Buy her an account? I'll give you a discount for mine.
god > man > horse > woman > dog

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Re: Random Posts from the Feminism and Gender Equality Thread
« Reply #2666 on: August 23, 2013, 10:15:25 AM »
+1
Quote from: DUNCAN DONUTS" post="418707547
Also, this article basically attempts to justify white women's fear of black men, though the author apologized. On the contrary, it's pretty clear that black men have more to fear from white women than vice-versa.

The second article she links to is written by a black guy and the summary of it is that since white women support white men, they are more dangerous to black men. It's kind of funny for all this talk about how the white man is such a danger to the black man, that the statistics never match up.

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Re: Random Posts from the Feminism and Gender Equality Thread
« Reply #2667 on: August 23, 2013, 07:33:14 PM »
0
Quote from: DUNCAN DONUTS" post="418707547
Also, this article basically attempts to justify white women's fear of black men, though the author apologized. On the contrary, it's pretty clear that black men have more to fear from white women than vice-versa.

The second article she links to is written by a black guy and the summary of it is that since white women support white men, they are more dangerous to black men. It's kind of funny for all this talk about how the white man is such a danger to the black man, that the statistics never match up.
The statistics used to if you go back far enough, but anything in the past 30 years just doesn't match the victim mentality the blacks are using to justify their racism and attacks on whites.

I registered just to post this gem.

Quote from: solovyov" post="418709853
That's a good piece, thanks for sharing it. I'm reminded of a conversation I had with my mom (nice liberal white lady feminist) when she started doing a type of volunteer work that required her to visit clients in a very poor, very black part of town (in the middle of the day!) and she was worried about people messing with her. It took a lot of talking to convince her that if anything people would be made too nervous by her presence to fuck with her. That a white woman in her 60s with signifiers of upper class status would not move around that community with a "victim" sign over her head as much as a "do not touch or you will get fucked" sign.

Welcome, stay and post some more.

That post is fucking hilarious on so many levels. First, it's an upper class white woman from the suburbs telling another upper class white woman from the suburbs what will happen in a black neighborhood neither have ever stepped foot in. And the other hilarious thing is that they don't even believe these fucking delusions. If they truly believed these neighborhoods are safe and they'd walk around with impunity, they'd fucking move there. Housing is dirt cheap, they could buy up a whole block for what they pay for a house in the suburbs. But for all the talk SJW have about how great and safe these communities really are, none of them have the fucking guts to move in to one.

I spent my early years in a crappy area before my parents got the fuck out. Lived pretty close to real shitty areas. There is no way the seas would part for this woman. They'd probably steal her purse and phone within minutes, maybe even fuck with her car. The idea that a bunch of gangbangers who have no issue shooting indiscriminately in areas where children play are going to suddenly become nervous tip their hat to Miss Daisy is just great.

Here is what happens when some uber-liberal decides that he's taking his upper middle class white self into a poor, black neighborhood.

http://www.twincities.com/crime/ci_23829526/st-paul-man-19-charged-east-side-beating

And I'm pretty liberal myself, just not fucking delusional.
There is a reason the rent is to cheap.  Its because its a shitty neighborhood.  I don't think that the beating described here was necessarily racially motivated, I think those folk would have beat on anyone walking by.

As much as I am against that nigger behavior of violence against others as a first resort to everything and am against the racist view of "fuck whitey" and "whitey needs to suffer for what happened to blacks", I know from firsthand experience that just walking through the "hood" as a white person doesn't necessarily mean you are going to get attacked.

Its not like people living in the hood are just posted at all entrances with knives/guns in hand waiting for white folk to appear.  They're people there doing their own thing, living their life, minding their own business.  You are more likely to get into a confrontation there, if you have nice things you are more likely to get confronted and get jumped, but you don't be attacked on site most the time if your just walking through or by.

That is unless you are walking by a fight.  In a fight peoples moods are violent and as a white person you are the common enemy for everyone to gang up on.  There are gangs that have initiations that require you to commit crimes/beatings against white people.  There are gangs whose target of choice is white people for their illegal activities.  As a white person you have to keep this in mind.  Just because a faggot pussy white kid posts on the internet lambasting their white priviledge and defending the Noble Negros doesn't mean shit when they walk past a group of blacks who may bang you out just for being white.

All of those smug cunts need to go outside and encounter real life situations.  For them, a life changing event is encountaring a black person or minority.  For me that is an every day occurance and is not news worthy.

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Re: Random Posts from the Feminism and Gender Equality Thread
« Reply #2668 on: August 23, 2013, 08:53:11 PM »
+2
If you see a 50 person brawl and just stroll on through you are a fucking idiot regardless of the races involved

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Re: Random Posts from the Feminism and Gender Equality Thread
« Reply #2669 on: August 23, 2013, 10:41:36 PM »
0
If you see a 50 person brawl and just stroll on through you are a fucking idiot regardless of the races involved

He probably had never seen such a large chimp out before and was all like "wtf this is straight outta discovery channel" and got mesmerized

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Re: Random Posts from the Feminism and Gender Equality Thread
« Reply #2670 on: August 23, 2013, 10:48:15 PM »
+1
He legit ran up and told them to stop fighting against themselves and to fight against their white capitalist oppressors
"Class solidarity, bros.  We can do better than this.  Join me in my crusade against racism!"
sheeeeeeeeeeeeeiiiiiiiiiiiitttttttttttttttttttt

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Re: Random Posts from the Feminism and Gender Equality Thread
« Reply #2671 on: August 23, 2013, 11:40:07 PM »
0
Quote
I have wrestled with the nigger demon in a number of ways.
:allears: :allears: :allears: :allears: :allears:

Someone sig this immediately :allears:

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Re: Random Posts from the Feminism and Gender Equality Thread
« Reply #2672 on: August 24, 2013, 12:30:25 AM »
0
Quote
I have wrestled with the nigger demon in a number of ways.
:allears: :allears: :allears: :allears: :allears:

Someone sig this immediately :allears:

Done.

Also, just to clarify, I asked about Adventure Time because there's an episode where someone holds up a convenience store and demands PB's crown so he can become a princess.  He ends up in the nuthouse.
Quote
I have wrestled with the nigger demon in a number of ways.


For people who consider themselves feminists they have even more rules for how a woman should think and act than the fucking Taliban.

https://radishmag.wordpress.com/2014/02/14/pump-and-dump/

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Re: Random Posts from the Feminism and Gender Equality Thread
« Reply #2673 on: August 24, 2013, 06:55:08 AM »
0
I registered just to post this gem.

Quote from: solovyov" post="418709853
That's a good piece, thanks for sharing it. I'm reminded of a conversation I had with my mom (nice liberal white lady feminist) when she started doing a type of volunteer work that required her to visit clients in a very poor, very black part of town (in the middle of the day!) and she was worried about people messing with her. It took a lot of talking to convince her that if anything people would be made too nervous by her presence to fuck with her. That a white woman in her 60s with signifiers of upper class status would not move around that community with a "victim" sign over her head as much as a "do not touch or you will get fucked" sign.

I'm struggling to comprehend it's meaning.  What does this puzzle MEAN

 :lilal:

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Re: Random Posts from the Feminism and Gender Equality Thread
« Reply #2674 on: August 24, 2013, 08:57:06 AM »
0
Quote
I have wrestled with the nigger demon in a number of ways.
:allears: :allears: :allears: :allears: :allears:

Someone sig this immediately :allears:

Done.

Also, just to clarify, I asked about Adventure Time because there's an episode where someone holds up a convenience store and demands PB's crown so he can become a princess.  He ends up in the nuthouse.
Do you remember the name of it, cuz now I really want to check the Tumblr tag for it as they obsess over that show and it sounds like something that would make them mad.

Some crazy woman (that people thought was a MtF transsexual because of her massive chin) was LITERALLY SHAKIGN after an episode made fun of fanfiction writers and shippers or something like that and she went on a rant about how the show is shaming queer fans or something. The ultimate irony being that she is one of the two (or more??) Tumblr SJWs that worked on official material for the show, so instead of nicely contacting the staff and asking them about, it she just called them out as being horrible bigots on her blog. So she was triggered by a children's cartoon AND gave up on a possible life-long dream by destroying her relationship with the creators of said children's cartoon. There are, like, layers of patheticness to this but the best part is being legitimately owned by a kids' show.
« Last Edit: August 24, 2013, 09:08:15 AM by internet culture »